Green & Blue Milk: Awesome or Awful?

Green and Blue Milk are specialty drinks in Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Hollywood Studios in Walt Disney World, and at Disneyland that come in both non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties. In this post, we’ll review this divisive drink, debate how it compares to Harry Potter’s Butterbeer, Dining Plan info, and our recommended approach with the Milk Stand in Star Wars Land.

By now, you’ve probably heard a lot about Green and Blue Milk. Perhaps you’ve even tried one or both yourself. Everyone who has tried these drinks seems to have a very strong opinion, with many being quite negative. If you have yet to try Green or Blue Milk, maybe you’ve already made your mind up to try, or not try, it based upon others’ feedback.

I went into my Green and Blue Milk experience totally uninformed, and with my opinion untainted by prior reviewers or any other feedback from friends. Basically, all I knew was what the Disney Parks Blog had shared, that they are fruit-flavored frozen drinks that are non-dairy and plant-based, made with coconut and rice milks.

My first Blue Milk and Green Milk experience actually came at the grand opening party for Disneyland’s Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, when an endless supply of both was free ‘on tap.’ (I say this not to boast, but to disclose that my initial impressions were also unencumbered by the price.)

My goal for the evening was mostly to wander around by myself and take photos of the cool searchlights set up for the event, but I also made frequent stops for Ronto Wraps and Blue Milk. My initial reaction, to borrow a dated reference (or is it now a classic line?) from Frank the Tank, was “as soon as it hits your lips, it’s so good!

Over the course of the night, I drank the equivalent of 6-8 full-size cups of Green and Blue Milk (which is more than anyone should have of this sugary beverage, but I couldn’t help myself). I absolutely loved it. There was something about both the consistency and creamy, fruity flavor that hit the spot for me.

It wasn’t until the end of the night when I met up with some friends that I realized not everyone is a fan. After I shared my opinion that the stuff is amazing, I learned that the consensus among literally everyone else in the group was that both varieties are disgusting. They all likened Green and Blue Milk to a variety of disparate things that are all objectively nasty.

In subsequent visits to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge post-opening with Sarah and friends, I found the feedback from Green and Blue Milk taste tests to be decidedly mixed. My totally unscientific results are that about 50% of people hate it, 20% are indifferent, and 30% love it.

I have to admit that once I had to pay for Blue Milk myself, I was far less enamored with the stuff. In terms of value for money, there’s no way to justify the $8 price tag. Mind you, I still really enjoy it, but $8 is a tough pill to swallow. At that price, it’s a one-and-done novelty for me.

Next, Green & Blue Milk v. Butterbeer. The ultimate showdown. In this battle royale between Disney and Universal, TWO THEME PARK DRINKS ENTER, AND ONLY ONE WILL LEAVE. Okay, not really. Just as we compared Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to Wizarding of World of Harry Potter in our full review of Disney’s new land, we’re doing the same here–for fun, not because of a silly, faux-rivalry.

Moreover, this is actually relevant because Disney has clearly been trying to come up with its own answer to Wizarding World of Harry Potter’s Butterbeer for the better part of the last decade. Thus far, to no avail. First there was Red’s Apple Freeze in Cars Land, followed by LeFou’s Brew in New Fantasyland. We’ve seen a number of other drinks come and go, with “Alcoholic Dole Whip” being the only thing that has really stuck–and that’s not exactly unique to Disney.

Now there’s Green Milk and Blue Milk. Much like Butterbeer had organic appeal thanks to its inclusion in the Harry Potter books, many Star Wars fans have wanted to taste Blue Milk since seeing Luke Skywalker drink a glass in Star Wars: Episode IV — A New Hope. (I’m not sure the same “fan demand” exists for the Green Milk that Luke squeezed from a thala-sirens in Star Wars: The Last Jedi.)

This is obviously a Disney fan site, but let’s not kid ourselves here. Butterbeer is not just iconic; it’s addictively good. It’s a drink I actively crave and is a must-buy whenever we’re at Universal. It’s the stuff of legends, and nothing hits the spot quite like Frozen Butterbeer (my personal favorite variety) on a hot and humid afternoon in Orlando.

While I’m a fan of Blue Milk, and find both its texture and creamy quality vaguely similar to Frozen Butterbeer, I don’t think the Star Wars Land drink measures up to any of the three varieties of Butterbeer. Moreover, the general park-going public as a whole is not going to be on board with the drinks of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to nearly the same extent.

Butterbeer is one of the greatest culinary concoctions in theme park history. If you don’t like it, that’s on you. (As with all things subjective, it’s hard to say “you’re wrong” if you don’t like Butterbeer, but this is basically the equivalent of disliking Citizen Kane, Catch-22, or Terminator 2.)

By contrast, Blue Milk and Green Milk are more ‘acquired taste’ kind of drinks. Some people will love them, some will hate them. But I think we can all agree that they’re not as universally beloved. Who knows, maybe Disney will finally have it’s answer with some sort of “beetle juice” served at Ant Man’s micro-brewery in Super Hero Land.

Moving on, we probably should’ve described the taste of these drinks before jumping into the review and comparison. The problem is that articulating the flavors of Green and Blue Milk is a fool’s errand. Officially, Blue Milk is flavored with dragon fruit, pineapple, lime, and watermelon. Green Milk is a citrus drink featuring mandarin orange, passion fruit, grapefruit, and orange blossom. You’d be hard-pressed to discern the exact fruits by tasting the drinks, though.

For me, the citrus flavors of Green Milk are apparent, and I could tell there’s orange juice (or at least orange flavor) in there somewhere. On the other hand, Blue Milk is more like a fruit punch (the kind that would’ve been red colored back in the day). However, the fruity flavor profiles of each are rather muted due to the coconut and rice milk. There’s also what we’ll call a floral essence to each.

If you ask 10 different people to describe the flavor of these drinks, you’ll get 10 different answers, making that somewhat of an exercise in futility. Nevertheless, I’d liken Blue Milk to a creamy, frozen Blue Hawaiian. In fact, there’s a Blue Hawaiian cream soda I really like that is similar in terms of flavor. The big difference here is this is not carbonated, and it has a thicker, creamy-but-textured consistency.

As for Green Milk, I’d liken that to an Ecto Cooler mixed with an uncarbonated coconut cream drink. Green Milk would definitely be Slimer’s drink of choice in Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, and I likewise found it to “work” pretty well. With that said, I’m definitely less enthusiastic about Green Milk.

Just as trying to describe the taste of these Star Wars Land milks is a fool’s errand, trying to ascertain whether or which to order based upon a review is fairly pointless.

For what it’s worth, Sarah liked the consistency of Green and Blue Milk, but found the flavors of both to be too artificial for her. She really enjoyed a couple sips of each, but would not order them again–nor would she be able to finish a full cup of either one. Her reaction and thoughts on the drinks totally differed from mine. (Again, 10 descriptions, 10 answers.)

Because of this, what we would recommend is to start by sharing. Dropping $30+ for 4 cups of this stuff is a dangerous and potentially devastating proposition.

No matter how large your party, order one of each. Perhaps both Green Milk and Blue Milk will be hits with everyone. Maybe you’ll all only like one or the other, or maybe you’ll hate both. No matter what the outcome, you can then determine whether it’s worth dropping more money on, or if you’re content with having tried it, gotten your photos for Instagram, and are ready to move on.

Another alternative, and this works especially well for those who don’t drink, is to order the Blue Bantha at Oga’s Cantina, which is non-alcoholic Blue Milk. (Read our full Oga’s Cantina Review for more on the Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge bar & lounge.)

The Blue Bantha presentation is superior to the Milk Stand version, and the smoother consistency is also arguably better. It’s a bit more expensive, but there’s also a delicious thick cookie atop the drink, making for even better Instagram photos, too.

After the initial hype of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge dies down, we wouldn’t be surprised to see Blue Milk and Green Milk added to the Disney Dining Plan as snack credits. While these are expensive as far as DDP snacks go, they’re only priced this high because they’re a novelty that will be a “must-have” for many guests. The actual cost of making them is probably lower than a cupcake or other, less expensive snack.

Guests using the Disney Dining Plan seems like the most likely way Walt Disney World will sustain demand for Blue and Green Milk once the novelty wears off. In other words, if you can wait a year to try it, don’t be surprised if you see Green and Blue Milk added to the Disney Dining Plan as snack credits sometime in 2020.

Overall, we do think it’s worth trying both Blue Milk and Green Milk. Maybe you’ll end up loving it, like I did. Maybe you won’t. Given the very different nature of these drinks, it’s tough to guess in advance how you’ll react to them. At the very least, it’s something to say you’ve tried, and fun to taste test them and see what your reactions are to the alien flavors. It’s sort of like Club Cool…but with an exorbitant price tag!

If you’re planning on visiting the new land, you’ll also want to read our Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Guide. This covers a range of topics from basics about the land and its location, to strategically choosing a hotel for your stay, recommended strategy for the land, and how to beat the crowds. It’s a good primer for this huge addition. As for planning the rest of your trip, we have a comprehensive Disneyland Vacation Planning Guide as well as a thorough Walt Disney World Planning Guide.

Your Thoughts

Have you tried Green Milk or Blue Milk? What are your ‘tasting notes’ from each of these drinks? Which did you prefer? Are you going to be the ‘oddball’ (no offense) who prefers Blue Milk to Butterbeer?! Do you agree or disagree with our assessment and recommendation? Any questions? Hearing your feedback—even when you disagree with us—is both interesting to us and helpful to other readers, so please share your thoughts below in the comments!


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